Mixture rich before descent!

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It's fully up to you to check any information you find here with
standard aviation industry sources such as aircraft maintenance
manuals, flying instruction books and, above all, FAA regulations!

 

Just be sure to go full rich on the mixture before reducing power for landing.

I know that this is a given and standard procedure, but I don't typically follow it due to the altitude of my home base. Field elevation at Big Bear (L35) is 6750'. When on final approach, my past Cherokee & Mooney would foul the plugs if I reduce power while full rich. So I'd leave the mixture pretty lean for landings.

HOWEVER ... In my Coupe when I come over the ridge line at 8000' and 50 degrees rich of peak, reduce power and start a decent to my surface elevation of 6750', the engine will quit! My last Ercoupe did the same as well.

Also be advise that you probably wouldn't even know that the engine was dead until you need to power up. I couldn't hear that the engine killed. Fortunately I needed a little boost to make the runway. When I added power to the throttle ... I got nothing but a case of "pucker factor". Then went full rich and cleaned it up. But final approach isn't a good time to discover your engine isn't running. I thought that I was going to have to land on a dry lake bed.

So test this at altitude to see if you get the same results from your mixture. It's happened to me at lower altitude airports as well.

First time I flew this Coupe was from a field elevation of 3059' Got up in the pattern to shoot some touch & goes prior to bringing the plane home. Started playing with the mixture in the pattern at a TPA of 4000'. Then chopped power for landing. At about 300' off the deck I realized I would fall short of the runway. So I gave it a boost of throttle, and nothing! Thought I was going to put it in the dirt that time. 

I'm just telling you this because if you had no mixture control in the past, it may not be an automatic response for you to go full rich prior to reducing power.

The carb is slow to respond to your adjustment settings as well. So adjust just a little at a time and wait to see your EGT catch up.

Soft Landings,
Richard Todd